Learning and Teaching at Gilson College

Learning for living, Character for life, Hope for the Future

This askatechteacher link has a comprehensive list of coding sites for teachers to use during Hour of Code! Very useful!

http://askatechteacher.com/2015/11/09/hour-of-code-3/


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Learning, Learning, Learning not Apps, Apps, Apps

Daniel Edwards writes on his ‘…blog [which] chronicles the trials and tribulations of 1:1 iPad deployment in a large secondary school:

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‘An app on its own is like a thinker without thoughts!’


‘…It may be the nature of the beast that apps alone form the basis for conversations about new technology in the classroom. However, the success of tablet provision in the classroom is NOT underpinned solely by apps…alll too often I see reference to ‘look how I can present these words across a picture to engage my students!’ or ‘Check out how this random name app selects my students.’ Don’t get me wrong, I’m sure these opportunities have a place as part of the process, but they certainly aren’t a reason to use tablets in the classroom. The power of learning with new technology lies with the teacher and the ability to choose the appropriate tool for the right intention. Moreover, success directly relates to the relationships between learner and educator, and the learner and learning…’ 

(Emphasis mine)

Read Daniel’s full post here: Learning, Learning, Learning not Apps, Apps, Apps


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From Circle: Why Are We Slow To Use Technology In Schools? By Greg Mitchell

20120531-061256.jpgGreg Mitchell introduces his post with what may be an all-to-familiar scenario:

“Now everyone, copy down all of these notes as you will need them for Friday’s mock exam,” instructed the teacher with a sweeping gesture across a whiteboard covered with neat black writing.

It was a simple enough direction for a Year 10 English class. However one student didn’t seem to believe it applied to him.

“Which part of ‘everyone’ don’t you get?” his teacher quizzed, using his second best sneering technique.

“Oh,” the student grunted, coming back into orbit with a bump. He fished deep in his pocket and produced his well-worn mobile phone.

Click! Click! Click!

“I’ve just emailed them home,” he said, peering into the screen. “What do you want me to do now?”

“Give me your phone,” the teacher replied, ramping up to the sneer he reserved for road rage, “It’s confiscated!”

Is this scenario a familiar one?

Read more here:

http://www.circle.org.au/view/gm/feb_2013_20130226132536


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SAMR Model for Integrating Technology into Learning and Teaching

Lynda Cutting, Senior National Partnership Advisor with Independent Schools Victoria , has written a short post to describe in simple terms the SAMR Model.

She writes:

…Like any tool, the power in this model is how it helps us create the best possible learning opportunities for our students. That means the first question is “what do I want my students to learn?” Then we can use the SAMR model to help us decide what app we can use to support our goal…

http://appsadaisy.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/the-samr-model/

There is also lots more on Lynda’s Appsadaisy blog to do with iPads and apps, teachers and students!

Lynda also co-presents with Craig, the  TECHexpress podcasts Episode 15 has just been released.

Here she explains the purpose of this blog:

TECHexpress is a podcast for busy teachers as they integrate ICT into their practice. We know how much teachers need to fit into a day so our podcasts will only be about 10 minutes long.

Each episode includes a discussion about a Web 2 tool to use in the classroom and a quick tip or tool that you might like to try.


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‘Science is for everyone, kids included’ – TED

Primary school students have their work published in a scientific journal!

From my standpoint as a Christian educator I disagree with the evolutionary presuppositions at the basis of the learnings of the students in this TED video, nevertheless it is an awesome example of what students (in this case Primary students) can achieve when they are encouraged by their teachers and facilitators to inquire into a question that they (the students) develop and want to explore.

It should be noted that their quest to be published took many more months than their inquiry! Because they were child scientists 😦

I’m sure you’ll enjoy watching the video, and will consider some more the value of Inquiry-based Learning, the value of persisting through all aspects of  any journey, and the importance of valuing our childrens’ learnings!

 


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Life of an Educator by Justin Tarte: Great leaders build great teams…

 

Justin Tarte states on his blog ‘Life of an Educator’, that he is  ‘Starting in a couple weeks [to] assume the role of the Director of Curriculum and Support Services in a district of 3,000 in the suburbs of St. Louis, MO…’ He has some insightful advice to share about building strong leadership teams. While his context is in the USA, the principles apply worldwide…

Great teams are few and far between, but I believe that’s because the premise of building a great team might be flawed. It’s so easy to build a team of educators who all think alike and have similar backgrounds and experiences. That is safe. That is comfortable. That is easy. That is too easy…

Great leaders assemble teams and tap into the strengths of the members of the team and openly seek out new members with vast and varied backgrounds. Great teams challenge and push each other while always questioning the status quo. Great leaders are able to build teams that believe and trust in one another, while also having high expectations for each and every member. Read more…

What are your thoughts about the make-up of leadership teams?

Life of an Educator by Justin Tarte: Great leaders build great teams….


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25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic

Are our teachers, or indeed leaders, isolationists or collaborative? Are most conversations in our educational workplaces professional or personal?

25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic.

In response to an article on this issue published in April in the USA (in The Atlantic), Edudemic.com  suggests a number of ideas that could assist leaders as well as teachers to enhance their connections with colleagues as they seek to pursue a more collaborative future in their schools and systems.

I’m sure a number of the ideas listed in the Edudemic post are already in place in your particular school or educational setting? Nevertheless, I’m sure you will find other ideas in the list to spark further interest in your continuing quest to develop your professional learning communities (PLCs) as well as to promote more professional conversations?

The following is a quote from the Edudemic post:

A growing criticism of the American education system is that teachers spend too much of their time distanced from their colleagues (a recent survey found that teachers spend just 3% of their school day collaborating with other teachers), encouraging competition rather than collaboration, and making it difficult for teachers to work together to solve educational and institutional issues.

Things don’t have to be that way, however, as there are many ways that teachers can reach out and connect with their colleagues and build a more collaborative atmosphere in their schools…[Edudemic has] come up with just a few here, but feel free to share your own experiences and ideas that can help other educators to connect and ultimately improve the quality of instruction they can offer students…

One idea – another PLC:

9. CREATE A PERSONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY. One of the most common ways that teachers these days are battling feeling isolated from their peers is by building a personal learning network or community. This can be composed of teachers at your school or from around the world. No matter who you choose to include, spend time sharing, talking, and collaborating on educational projects and ideas… Read more