Learning and Teaching at Gilson College

Learning for living, Character for life, Hope for the Future


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TED: Susan Cain: ‘The power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking’

Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert or somewhere in between (ambivert), Susan’ Cain’s TED talk is important viewing, and should be shared widely.

http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

As well, Susan recently wrote a very interesting opinion piece in TIME Ideas – ‘Why gadgets are great for introverts’.

In all planning for learning and teaching in our classrooms we must consciously consider the introvert as well as the extrovert and ambivert students!

After viewing the TED video or reading Susan’s article you might like to use one of these Thinking prompts to help in your reflections:

Claim-Support-Question

  1. Make a claim about the topic
  2. Identify support for your claim
  3. Ask a question related to your claim

Or

Inspiration

  1. What feelings do you have after experiencing this?
  2. How were you made to feel this way?
  3. What would you like to do with these feelings? 

If Susan’s TED talk, her article and your reflections have whetted your appetite for exploring further I recommend that you read Susan’s book ‘Quiet – The Power of Introverts’. There is an eBook version too. Here!

A tweet today also lead me to Royan Lee’s blog, where he posts about his analysis of data he collected about his students, their personality types, and the effect of their use of social media and digital devices on their learning. Royan’s  ‘…mom ‘n pop research…’ (Action research) is linked here: Social Media and Introverts: by Royan Lee

Take Susan’s Quiet Quiz: Are You an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Related Articles:

Embracing Introversion: Ways to Stimulate Reserved Students in the Classroom 

Introversion and the Invisible Adolescent by Mark Phillips


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An EdTECHLive Interview with ‘Making Thinking Visible’ Co-Author, Ron Ritchhart

This interview was sourced from Steve Hargadon‘s interview series website:

The Future of Education: Charting the Course of Teaching and Learning in a Networked World

Steve writes there about his interview series:

‘This interview series and the community are devoted to providing an opportunity for those who care about education to share their voices and ideas with others. It’s a place for thoughtful discussion on an incredibly important topic… ‘ READ ON…

Follow the link below to listen to Steve’s interview with Ron Ritchhart:

Making Thinking Visible with Ron Ritchhart – Audio from EdTECHLive webinarMaking Thinking Visible book image

Or click on the audio file:

(Steve and Ron have a few audio issues in parts of the interview but it’s worth persisting.)

Link to Visible Thinking in action website at Project Zero, Harvard University


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Jesus Christ – Master Teacher: What ideas might resonate with a Christian teacher?

Jesus Christ – Master Teacher

The Journal of Adventist Education, December 2010/January 2011

In his article, author John Wesley Taylor V challenges us as Christian teachers to consider the teaching strategies Christ used when interacting with his disciples, and with small groups and large crowds. As we consider John’s point of view, what might be the implications for us as Christian teachers in our Christian schools as we interact day by day with our students and our colleagues?

The following quote from the article is the introduction to John’s thinking. Follow the link above or at the end of the quote to read the full article.

‘While Jesus was clearly an effective preacher and sought-after healer, He was also a master teacher. Throughout the Gospels readers encounter a variety of teaching episodes—learning experiences created specifically for His 12 disciples, as well as for groups of thousands or a single individual.2 His Sermon on the Mount, for example, was actually an outdoor teaching session in which both the disciples and a large group participated.

Jesus oriented His teaching to actively engage His students in the learning experience. To do this, He focused on thinking, knowing, understanding, being, and doing

Thinking.When teaching, Jesus would often ask His students, “What do you think?” In introducing the story of the good shepherd, for example, He extended an invitation to consider carefully the meaning of the story…’ Read more

Leaders, you might want to use this article and a thinking routine such as ‘Think Puzzle Explore’ (outlined below) to engage your staff in exploring the themes and ideas that this article raises.

This thinking routine is one that sets the stage for deeper inquiry into a topic by connecting the reader ‘to prior knowledge, stimulating curiosity and laying the groundwork for independent inquiry’. Visible Thinking Routines

Think Puzzle Explore

  1. What do you think you know about this topic?
  2. What questions or puzzles do you have?
  3. How can you explore this topic?


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Thinking and Writing Ideas in ASV’s Tumblr – London 1908

I just published this visual thinking prompt in ASV’s Thinking and Writing Ideas Tumblr.
In our Tumblr blog you can find more London 2012 Olympic-themed visual prompts that teachers could use with their students during the next 2 weeks of the olympic games to develop students’ looking, thinking and responding skills – whether that’s by writing, speaking, using ICT, art etc.
Images are reblogged from other Tumblr blogs, with thinking prompts courtesy of Tom March and Visible Thinking. Check the others out here. (Scroll down.)

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guardian:

Former Guardian journalist Emil Voigt, a wiry vegetarian from Manchester, stunned his rivals at the London Games of 1908 by storming to victory in the five mile race and becoming the first – and only – Briton to win a long-distance individual gold medal. Photograph: Emil Voigt Collection

Voigt, who reported from Europe for the Guardian between 1905 and 1906 before returning to Manchester to write on sport, was on the verge of retiring from competitive athletics in 1908 when he made a last-ditch decision to take part just six weeks before the opening ceremony.

Then – London Olympics – 1908:

This image shows the 1908 London Olympics athletics track, an athlete, probably some officials and in the background the ‘stadium’.

Now – London Olympics – 2012:

Over the next 2 weeks TV cameras, newspaper photographers and people like us using the Internet will publish images of the 2012 London Olympic venues for all the world to see.

Compare and Contrast

Search for images of the 2012 venues, especially the athletics stadium, track and athletes and compare and contrast the 2012 image to this 1908 photo. Also Compare and contrast the text attached to this and your image collection.

  1. What differences and similarities do you see between the venues shown in the images?
  2. What differences do you discover from the text?
  3. Use a Venn diagram to record your discoveries.


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RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms

A very familiar TED talk by Sir Ken Robinson animated by RSA – which, while probably also familiar to you, I bears reviewing and considering. What are your thoughts?

What’s so great about…

  1. Why do you think people say this is so great?
  2. List what makes it “outstanding?”
  3. Do you have a similar or different opinion?
  4. What is your opinion?


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VISIBLE THINKING – Project Zero, Harvard University

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At our 2012 Adventist Schools Victoria Annual Conference (ASVAC) we chose to place in the hands of each teacher a copy of the book ‘Visible Thinking’ by Ron Ritchhart, Mark Church & Karin Morrison
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The precursor to this book is the PROJECT ZERO VISIBLE THINKING website. The resources on the site will be useful to complement your reading of the book.
There you will find PDFs of most of the Thinking Routines that are featured in the book. These PDFs can be used as easy references for teachers, as well as handouts to students.

The following quote from the website introduces Visible Thinking In Action:

VisibleThinking In Action

Every committed educator wants better learning and more thoughtful students. Visible Thinking is a way of helping to achieve that without a separate ‘thinking skills’ course or fixed lessons.

Visible Thinking is a broad and flexible framework for enriching classroom learning in the content areas and fostering students’ intellectual development at the same time. Here are some of its key goals:

  1. Deeper understanding of content,
  2. Greater motivation for learning,
  3. Development of learners’ thinking and learning abilities,
  4. Development of learners’ attitudes toward thinking and learning and their alertness to opportunities for thinking and learning (the “dispositional” side of thinking),
  5. A shift in classroom culture toward a community of enthusiastically engaged thinkers and learners.

Toward achieving these goals, Visible Thinking involves several practices and resources. Teachers are invited to use with their students a number of “thinking routines” — simple protocols for exploring ideas — around whatever topics are important, say fractions arithmetic, the Industrial Revolution, World War II, the meaning of a poem, the nature of democracy. Visible Thinking includes attention to four “thinking ideals” — understanding, truth, fairness, and creativity. Visible Thinking emphasizes several ways of making students’ thinking visible to themselves and one another, so that they can improve it.

The idea of visible thinking helps to make concrete what a thoughtful classroom might look like. At any moment, we can ask, “Is thinking visible here? Are students explaining things to one another? Are students offering creative ideas? Are they, and I as their teacher, using the language of thinking? Is there a brainstorm about alternative interpretations on the wall? Are students debating a plan?”

When the answers to questions like these are consistently yes, students are more likely to show interest and commitment as learning unfolds in the classroom. They find more meaning in the subject matters and more meaningful connections between school and everyday life. They begin to display the sorts of attitudes toward thinking and learning we would most like to see in young learners — not closed-minded but open-minded, not bored but curious, neither gullible nor sweepingly negative but appropriately skeptical, not satisfied with “just the facts” but wanting to understand.

Continue reading.


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Flash Mob in Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gww9_S4PNV0&rel=0

What’s so great about…

  1. Why do you think people say this is so great?
  2. List what makes it “outstanding?”
  3. What would you do differently?