Learning and Teaching at Gilson College

Learning for living, Character for life, Hope for the Future


Leave a comment

From Circle: Why Are We Slow To Use Technology In Schools? By Greg Mitchell

20120531-061256.jpgGreg Mitchell introduces his post with what may be an all-to-familiar scenario:

“Now everyone, copy down all of these notes as you will need them for Friday’s mock exam,” instructed the teacher with a sweeping gesture across a whiteboard covered with neat black writing.

It was a simple enough direction for a Year 10 English class. However one student didn’t seem to believe it applied to him.

“Which part of ‘everyone’ don’t you get?” his teacher quizzed, using his second best sneering technique.

“Oh,” the student grunted, coming back into orbit with a bump. He fished deep in his pocket and produced his well-worn mobile phone.

Click! Click! Click!

“I’ve just emailed them home,” he said, peering into the screen. “What do you want me to do now?”

“Give me your phone,” the teacher replied, ramping up to the sneer he reserved for road rage, “It’s confiscated!”

Is this scenario a familiar one?

Read more here:

http://www.circle.org.au/view/gm/feb_2013_20130226132536


Leave a comment

Some excellent English usage, and other Infographics from huntingenglish

Alex Quigley, (I identified Alex from his twitter handle, @HuntingEnglish ) writes on his blog of the same name:

I have to say I am mildly addicted to finding these great infographics. They are an excellent way of presenting a vast amount of information in a lively, visually interesting way. I am set on finding the best of them and when I get some time in the summer actually creating my own!

Alex certainly has found some very informative and useful infographics, which you might be able to put to good use in your teaching and learning programs.

FOLLOW THIS LINK:
Infographics | huntingenglish


Leave a comment

Celebrating Teacher Learning: Justin Martin reflects on his 2012 PL Journey with Web 2.0

The Action Research-based (AR) whole-school teacher professional learning cycle at one of our schools – Gilson College – culminates each year in a Celebrate Teachers’ Learning day, where 12 staff members are asked to present about their current learning and its effect for their development as teachers, and the results for their students. This year the school celebrated the day on Monday, October 8.
During 2012 Year 4 teacher, Justin Martin investigated use of Web 2.0 with his students. Part of his creative AR presentation included a song. The video and words are posted here. Thanks Justin for permission to share.

Justin writes:
I wrote this song for a presentation I did as part of Action Research at my school. I was able to present in any style I wanted and so I re-wrote ‘Vincent’ by Don McLean. The COWS mentioned in the song stands for Computers On Wheels which we use at the school…not actual moo cows. Hope you enjoy.

Web 2.0

(to the tune of ‘Vincent’ by Don McLean)
Using IT right
 That’s what I set out to do
 Reading, thinking, playing too
 Learning as I go along.
 Talked with all my group
Worked out what I wanted to find,
Twitter, wordle, wikis, blogs
And other Web 2.0 tools!
Now I understand
What all these things do for me,
I know these will help my pedagogy.
The kids will learn and all is good.
They did not listen,
They did not know how!
Perhaps they’ll listen now.
Looked round at different blogs,
Found one I liked the look of:
www dot kidblog dot org
Messed around a bit.
Posted different things,
Not really knowing what to do
Mistakes there were quite a few
But I’m glad I persevered!
Now I understand
What all these things do for me,
I know these will help my pedagogy.
The kids will learn and all is good.
They did not listen,
They did not know how
I hope they’ll listen now!
Some problems that I faced:
Kids not knowing what to post,
So I let them go I gave them rope,
And really let them have a lot of fun!
COWS had minds of their own,
The internet was really slow,
Children could not get it at home,
And so I had to work with what I had!
Now they understand
Why they do these things for me
It helps with their pedagogy
They are learning and all is good.
They started listening
They are  listening still,
I hope they always will!
Thank you Gruen


Leave a comment

TED: Susan Cain: ‘The power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking’

Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert or somewhere in between (ambivert), Susan’ Cain’s TED talk is important viewing, and should be shared widely.

http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

As well, Susan recently wrote a very interesting opinion piece in TIME Ideas – ‘Why gadgets are great for introverts’.

In all planning for learning and teaching in our classrooms we must consciously consider the introvert as well as the extrovert and ambivert students!

After viewing the TED video or reading Susan’s article you might like to use one of these Thinking prompts to help in your reflections:

Claim-Support-Question

  1. Make a claim about the topic
  2. Identify support for your claim
  3. Ask a question related to your claim

Or

Inspiration

  1. What feelings do you have after experiencing this?
  2. How were you made to feel this way?
  3. What would you like to do with these feelings? 

If Susan’s TED talk, her article and your reflections have whetted your appetite for exploring further I recommend that you read Susan’s book ‘Quiet – The Power of Introverts’. There is an eBook version too. Here!

A tweet today also lead me to Royan Lee’s blog, where he posts about his analysis of data he collected about his students, their personality types, and the effect of their use of social media and digital devices on their learning. Royan’s  ‘…mom ‘n pop research…’ (Action research) is linked here: Social Media and Introverts: by Royan Lee

Take Susan’s Quiet Quiz: Are You an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Related Articles:

Embracing Introversion: Ways to Stimulate Reserved Students in the Classroom 

Introversion and the Invisible Adolescent by Mark Phillips


Leave a comment

Formative vs summative assessment – and unthinking policy about them

 

 

 I meant to add the link below (from a 2011 Grant Wiggins blog post) as a related article on my last post on Grant’s articles about Feedback. All of his articles and posts are interesting to read together.

Grant explains the context for his post. He writes in response to an email query about a Formative and Summative assessment policy.

Grant writes:

‘…In theory, I would define ‘formative’ assessment as “useful feedback with an opportunity to use that feedback” to perform optimally on later summative assessments…’

and,

‘…what makes a formative assessment formative – is whether I have a chance to get and use feedback in a later version of the ‘same’ performance. It’s only formative if it is ongoing; it’s only summative if it is the final chance, the ‘summing up’ of student performance…’

Read the full post here:

Formative v Summative Assessment

 


Leave a comment

An EdTECHLive Interview with ‘Making Thinking Visible’ Co-Author, Ron Ritchhart

This interview was sourced from Steve Hargadon‘s interview series website:

The Future of Education: Charting the Course of Teaching and Learning in a Networked World

Steve writes there about his interview series:

‘This interview series and the community are devoted to providing an opportunity for those who care about education to share their voices and ideas with others. It’s a place for thoughtful discussion on an incredibly important topic… ‘ READ ON…

Follow the link below to listen to Steve’s interview with Ron Ritchhart:

Making Thinking Visible with Ron Ritchhart – Audio from EdTECHLive webinarMaking Thinking Visible book image

Or click on the audio file:

(Steve and Ron have a few audio issues in parts of the interview but it’s worth persisting.)

Link to Visible Thinking in action website at Project Zero, Harvard University


Leave a comment

‘Ten Roles For Teacher Leaders’ by Cindy Harrison and Joellen Killion, ASCD

Every teacher is a leader – in their classroom and in their school.

This principles of teacher-leadership outlined in Cindy Harrison’s and Joellen Killon’s article published in Educational Leadership in September 2007, Volume 65, No 1, ‘Teachers as Leaders’ continue to hold true and are worth thoughtful consideration by every educator.

Cindy and Joellen write:

‘The ways teachers can lead are as varied as teachers themselves.

Teacher leaders assume a wide range of roles to support school and student success. Whether these roles are assigned formally or shared informally, they build the entire school’s capacity to improve. Because teachers can lead in a variety of ways, many teachers can serve as leaders among their peers.So what are some of the leadership options available to teachers? The following 10 roles are a sampling of the many ways teachers can contribute to their schools’ success…

Roles for All

Teachers exhibit leadership in multiple, sometimes overlapping, ways. Some leadership roles are formal with designated responsibilities. Other more informal roles emerge as teachers interact with their peers. The variety of roles ensures that teachers can find ways to lead that fit their talents and interests. Regardless of the roles they assume, teacher leaders shape the culture of their schools, improve student learning, and influence practice among their peers.’

The roles they outline are:

1. Resource Provider, 2. Instructional Specialist, 3. Curriculum Specialist, 4. Classroom Supporter, 5. Learning Facilitator, 6. Mentor, 7. School Leader, 8. Data Coach, 9. Catalyst for Change, 10. Learner

Read the full article and more about the roles here :