Learning and Teaching at Gilson College

Learning for living, Character for life, Hope for the Future


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TED: Susan Cain: ‘The power of introverts in a world that can’t stop talking’

Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert or somewhere in between (ambivert), Susan’ Cain’s TED talk is important viewing, and should be shared widely.

http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

As well, Susan recently wrote a very interesting opinion piece in TIME Ideas – ‘Why gadgets are great for introverts’.

In all planning for learning and teaching in our classrooms we must consciously consider the introvert as well as the extrovert and ambivert students!

After viewing the TED video or reading Susan’s article you might like to use one of these Thinking prompts to help in your reflections:

Claim-Support-Question

  1. Make a claim about the topic
  2. Identify support for your claim
  3. Ask a question related to your claim

Or

Inspiration

  1. What feelings do you have after experiencing this?
  2. How were you made to feel this way?
  3. What would you like to do with these feelings? 

If Susan’s TED talk, her article and your reflections have whetted your appetite for exploring further I recommend that you read Susan’s book ‘Quiet – The Power of Introverts’. There is an eBook version too. Here!

A tweet today also lead me to Royan Lee’s blog, where he posts about his analysis of data he collected about his students, their personality types, and the effect of their use of social media and digital devices on their learning. Royan’s  ‘…mom ‘n pop research…’ (Action research) is linked here: Social Media and Introverts: by Royan Lee

Take Susan’s Quiet Quiz: Are You an Introvert or an Extrovert?

Related Articles:

Embracing Introversion: Ways to Stimulate Reserved Students in the Classroom 

Introversion and the Invisible Adolescent by Mark Phillips


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‘Making Time for Feedback’ by Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey

More on formative assessment and feedback from ASCD’s September 2012 edition of Educational Leadership journal:

‘Feedback for Learning’

Douglas and Nancy write:

‘Teachers don’t need to mark every mistake a student makes. Here re some smart ways to save time and give great feedback.

Ask any teacher what he or she needs more of, and it’s a good bet that time will top the list. Anything that promises to recoup a little bit of our workday time is sure to be a best seller.

One overlooked time-saver is in how we use feedback. Teachers know that feedback is important for teaching and learning. Unfortunately, most secondary teachers have far too many students to make it realistic to provide individual, face-to-face feedback, so they rely on written feedback to do the heavy lifting. In an attempt to provide students with information about their performance regularly, they grade papers until the wee hours, writing carefully constructed comments in the margin.

Too often, this type of feedback transfers the responsibility for learning back to students, who have little understanding of what they need to do next…’ READ ON…

Two videos are also attached to the article:

1. EL editor-in-chief Marge Scherer’s interview with Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey.

2. Algebra teacher Ben Teichman from Health Sciences High in San Diego answers Nancy Frey‘s questions about feedback

Source: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept12/vol70/num01/Making-Time-for-Feedback.aspx#interview

Related articles:

‘Feedback for Learning: Seven Keys to Effective Feedback’, Grant Wiggins in Educational Leadership (gilsoncollegelandt.wordpress.com)
Seven Keys to Effective Feedback (annmic.wordpress.com)


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‘Lead Like Jesus’ – Ken Blanchard

A tweet today pointed me to this YouTube video (April 2012),

Lead Like Jesus‘ – presented by Dr Ken Blanchard.

While Dr Blanchard, the global and spiritual leader of the Ken Blanchard Company, speaks from the point of view of leading within business the points he makes are equally applicable to we Christians who lead in Christian or secular educational settings.

Ken speaks of how Jesus took 12 unlikely men and transformed them from novices into master leaders. He also speaks of his own journey as a follower of Jesus and how he puts the principles found in the life of Jesus of servant leadership, into practice in his life and business.

Where did Jesus learn about leadership?

Who was the first servant leader?

Why did the Father make Jesus a carpenter?

What principles from the Saviour’s life will always hold us in good stead in our role as leaders?

The Video is 1 hour 19 minutes long but if you have the time it is well worth viewing and reflecting on.

A related 55 min. video is the one linked here: ‘Developing your leadership point of view‘, where Ken outlines more of the principles of Jesus’ servant leadership. Also well worth the time to view and reflect on.


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QR Codes – More fun!

 

You may already know much about QR codes, or have learnt more in my last QR Code post.

Nevertheless, to learn more about QR Codes and how they can be used in learning and teaching, use your smartphone or tablet QR reader to scan these codes Links to some simple to follow tips.

You don’t have a QR reader on your device? I’m sure you can use your favourite browser to find the most suitable app for your device! Consider downloading a suitable app and then explore here to see what QR codes are all about. Once you do you’ll see them everywhere! Happy QR coding 🙂

QR Codes - Part 1QR Codes - Part 2Audio QR Codes

And this last one is a ‘Thank you’ link to the source author’s website, which you’ve probably found by now!

Tech Tips of the Week


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Formative vs summative assessment – and unthinking policy about them

 

 

 I meant to add the link below (from a 2011 Grant Wiggins blog post) as a related article on my last post on Grant’s articles about Feedback. All of his articles and posts are interesting to read together.

Grant explains the context for his post. He writes in response to an email query about a Formative and Summative assessment policy.

Grant writes:

‘…In theory, I would define ‘formative’ assessment as “useful feedback with an opportunity to use that feedback” to perform optimally on later summative assessments…’

and,

‘…what makes a formative assessment formative – is whether I have a chance to get and use feedback in a later version of the ‘same’ performance. It’s only formative if it is ongoing; it’s only summative if it is the final chance, the ‘summing up’ of student performance…’

Read the full post here:

Formative v Summative Assessment

 


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‘Feedback for Learning: Seven Keys to Effective Feedback’, Grant Wiggins in Educational Leadership

From ASCD, Educational Leadership Journal: September 2012 | Volume 70 | Number 1  Feedback for Learning Pages 10-16

In his article ‘Feedback for Learning: Seven Keys to Effective Feedback’, Grant Wiggins writes:

‘…Advice, evaluation, grades—none of these provide the descriptive information that students need to reach their goals. What is true feedback—and how can it improve learning?

Who would dispute the idea that feedback is a good thing? Both common sense and research make it clear: Formative assessment, consisting of lots of feedback and opportunities to use that feedback, enhances performance and achievement.

Yet even John Hattie (2008), whose decades of research revealed that feedback was among the most powerful influences on achievement, acknowledges that he has “struggled to understand the concept” (p. 173). And many writings on the subject don’t even attempt to define the term. To improve formative assessment practices among both teachers and assessment designers, we need to look more closely at just what feedback is—and isn’t…’

What Is Feedback, Anyway?…’ Read on for the full article:

Educational Leadership: Feedback for Learning: Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

Then, on his blog ‘Granted, but…‘, Wiggins writes more on this subject and includes some tangible steps to providing and developing effective feedback, that  teachers might use with their students, as well as links for his final draft for the EL article and a PowerPoint, which provide fuller thinking on the topic. Find that ‘On Feedback’ blog post here.


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An EdTECHLive Interview with ‘Making Thinking Visible’ Co-Author, Ron Ritchhart

This interview was sourced from Steve Hargadon‘s interview series website:

The Future of Education: Charting the Course of Teaching and Learning in a Networked World

Steve writes there about his interview series:

‘This interview series and the community are devoted to providing an opportunity for those who care about education to share their voices and ideas with others. It’s a place for thoughtful discussion on an incredibly important topic… ‘ READ ON…

Follow the link below to listen to Steve’s interview with Ron Ritchhart:

Making Thinking Visible with Ron Ritchhart – Audio from EdTECHLive webinarMaking Thinking Visible book image

Or click on the audio file:

(Steve and Ron have a few audio issues in parts of the interview but it’s worth persisting.)

Link to Visible Thinking in action website at Project Zero, Harvard University