Learning and Teaching at Gilson College

Learning for living, Character for life, Hope for the Future

25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic

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Are our teachers, or indeed leaders, isolationists or collaborative? Are most conversations in our educational workplaces professional or personal?

25 Ways Teachers Can Connect More With Their Colleagues | Edudemic.

In response to an article on this issue published in April in the USA (in The Atlantic), Edudemic.com  suggests a number of ideas that could assist leaders as well as teachers to enhance their connections with colleagues as they seek to pursue a more collaborative future in their schools and systems.

I’m sure a number of the ideas listed in the Edudemic post are already in place in your particular school or educational setting? Nevertheless, I’m sure you will find other ideas in the list to spark further interest in your continuing quest to develop your professional learning communities (PLCs) as well as to promote more professional conversations?

The following is a quote from the Edudemic post:

A growing criticism of the American education system is that teachers spend too much of their time distanced from their colleagues (a recent survey found that teachers spend just 3% of their school day collaborating with other teachers), encouraging competition rather than collaboration, and making it difficult for teachers to work together to solve educational and institutional issues.

Things don’t have to be that way, however, as there are many ways that teachers can reach out and connect with their colleagues and build a more collaborative atmosphere in their schools…[Edudemic has] come up with just a few here, but feel free to share your own experiences and ideas that can help other educators to connect and ultimately improve the quality of instruction they can offer students…

One idea – another PLC:

9. CREATE A PERSONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY. One of the most common ways that teachers these days are battling feeling isolated from their peers is by building a personal learning network or community. This can be composed of teachers at your school or from around the world. No matter who you choose to include, spend time sharing, talking, and collaborating on educational projects and ideas… Read more

Author: Sandra England

Learning & Teaching Coordinator F-12 at Gilson College, an Adventist Schools Victoria school. Twitter: @GCLandT or @sandy_e

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